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Tea Caddy

Tea caddies are containers used for keeping loose tea. They can be made from wood, glass and china but also precious metals such as silver. The use of the tea caddy became increasingly popular in the UK after 1700 and by 1800 they were in widespread use.

Antique silver tea caddies from the Georgian period are often rectangular in form and, in addition to their silver hallmarks, will often carry maker’s marks.


Silver tea caddy

Saleroom selection: 5 silver tea caddies at upcoming auctions

30 January 2018

Silver tea caddies come in many different shapes and sizes, but also range in price from the few hundreds to the few thousands with differences in terms of marks, makers, rarity and condition influencing value. Here, we pick out a selection of items available in the next fortnight, with estimates ranging from £100-5000.

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Tiffany tea caddy draws bidding at Hansons

04 July 2014

Discovered at a regional valuation day held in Shropshire by Hansons of Etwall, this Tiffany and Co. silver and mixed-media tea caddy had been a wedding gift and had remained in the family of the vendor since the 1920s.

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Tea caddies take £17,000 in West Sussex

20 August 2012

The highlight of Bellmans’ latest three-day sale at Wisborough Green, West Sussex was an impressive set of three George II tortoiseshell and silver tea caddies in a fitted silver-mounted tortoiseshell case.

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Beware this opportunist couple

18 December 2007

DEALERS are being asked to look out for the couple, pictured here, who attempted to steal a tea caddy from Patrick Sandberg Antiques in London’s Kensington Church Street on November 28.

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Rare and not-so-rare Liberty

18 August 2004

PICTURED here are two pieces of Liberty & Co metalwork sold by Fieldings (12.5% buyers premium) of Hagley on July 17. The 8in (20cm) high pewter timepiece, top right, with a central copper and enamel dial with two enamel cabochons to the base, is a recorded design by Archibald Knox. The case, still with original patina, is fitted with a Lenzkirch brass bodied movement (the original key fitted to the door) and the base stamped 0370 Tudric.

Putting a tiger in the tankard

10 September 2002

WHILE prices for run-of-the-mill silver have been all but flat-lining since the extraordinary Seventies boom, there are welcome blips from time to time to show the market isn’t quite dead.

Tea – it’s in the can

25 February 2002

Tea-drinking first took off in the West in the late 17th century and in its wake came a whole host of paraphernalia associated with the consumption and storage of the beverage.

Crossover appeal puts caddies top

26 October 2001

THE acceptance that silver has long lost its shine does not mean that there is no active market, just that prices are lower. After this sale of 340 lots at Phillips’ Midlands operation on 19 September the familiar picture emerged of modern pieces struggling, standard material chugging along and items with appeal beyond the metal doing rather well.