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Nantgarw

Nantgarw pottery dates back to 1813 when William Billingsley and his son-in-law Samuel Walker built a kiln on the eastern bank of Glamorganshire Canal, north of Cardiff in Wales. Using Billingsley’s secret recipe, they began producing a soft paste porcelain which became renowned for its translucency.

Nantgarw porcelain often carries an identifying mark but values are often determined by the period of production – the first period being from 1813, the second after 1820 and the third from 1833 when the vacant pottery was taken over by William Henry Pardoe and production concentrated on stoneware bottles and glazed earthenware.


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Peaks and valleys for Welsh pots

25 September 2017

Auctioneer hails return to form for Swansea and Nantgarw porcelain at Cardiff themed sale...

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Nantgarw dessert service is a sweet success

13 April 2015

A 20-piece Nantgarw dessert service has sold for £20,000 at Campbells of Worthing. It was consigned on behalf of a titled lady.

Nantgarw porcelain plate sold at Philip Serrell

26 May 2004

Right: this fine Nantgarw porcelain plate, once thought to be painted by Thomas Baxter and traditionally known as the ‘Three Graces’, was part of a collection of porcelain offered by Worcestershire auctioneers Philip Serrell on May 20.

PREVIEW

11 May 2004

THIS fine Nantgarw porcelain plate, right, once thought to be painted by Thomas Baxter and traditionally known as the ‘Three Graces’, is part of a collection of porcelain to be offered by Worcestershire auctioneers Philip Serrell on May 20.