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Latest news from Antiques Trade Gazette, the leading specialist publication for the art and antiques market


Halls take over Chester business

24 May 1999

UK: HALLS of Shrewsbury have acquired Boothmans in the heart of Chester. The saleroom and fine art business belonging to Peter and Sally Williams once housed Sotheby’s Chester branch – where Richard Allen of Halls was director.

Mixed fortunes for New York art

24 May 1999

US: THE bonanza of Impressionist and 19th century art sales in New York, headlined by the record $55m (£33.5m) hammer price paid for a Cézanne still life, has highlighted various trends in the market, not least the dominance of Post Impressionist works.

Chests of drawers break Billingshurst record

24 May 1999

THE first of the new-format International Sales at Sotheby’s Sussex rooms could hardly have got off to a more successful launch – not only a premium-inclusive total of £750,000 from the 513 lots of ceramics and furniture on day one but also the highest price ever recorded for furniture at Billingshurst, when they sold at more than five times high estimate to a London dealer for £62,000 plus 15/10 per cent buyer’s premium.

Collector lured to cast net wider

24 May 1999

UK: BY the mid-19th century Redditch in Warwickshire had become the centre of the world for the production of fishing hooks and needles, supposedly skills handed down by the monks of Bordesley Abbey, who learnt their metalworking talents from links with Spain.

Invention of the year award for new security system

24 May 1999

UK: A SECURITY device which promises to revolutionise the handling and mobility of large antiques – in particular garden statuary – has just come onto the market after winning the London International Inventions Fair Invention of the Year Award.

Ceramics gravy train?

24 May 1999

UK: THE Cornish Ware range is one of a number of once everyday 20th century ceramics now attracting serious collectors.

Going shell, going well

17 May 1999

UK: THOSE decorative pieces worked by amateurs using seashells have always come low down in the art world pecking order but of late their attractions have become more and more appreciated as seen when an Irish pair of shellwork botanical studies took £26,000 at Mallams, Oxford, on February 3.