BADA logo new.jpg
The revised logo of the British Antique Dealers' Association, adopted in 2016 as part of the modernisation of the trade body ahead of its centenary in 2018.

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The circular blue and gold logo depicting the Renaissance goldsmith surrounded by the words ‘British Antique Dealers’ Association’ had been BADA’s logo since the early 1920s. However, it was replaced with the abbreviation ‘BADA’ as part of rebranding ahead of its centenary in 2018.

The decision to ‘streamline’ the logo has proved divisive, with some of the 350- plus BADA dealers continuing to use the Cellini version in shop windows and on company literature.

As part of an overall review of strategy, BADA’s council has asked members to vote on the “essential elements” they want incorporated in a revised logo.

Members can opt to keep the corefeatures of the Cellini emblem or an updated version, to abbreviate the association’s name or not, and include the words ‘established 1918’.

After collating member feedback BADA will commission a designer to create versions for a final vote, with plans to launch its new logo later this year.

Book dealer Tim Bryars of Bryars & Bryars favours the old emblem. “Cellini is such a distinctive figure, so much so that I still have the logo in a glass plaque displayed proudly in my shop window. I’m happy to be represented by a polymath like Cellini, but I’m also glad that BADA are willing to have a debate about it.”

I’m happy to be represented by a polymath like Cellini, but I’m also glad that BADA are willing to debate it

Architectural antiques dealer Nicholas Gifford-Mead, said: “Certainly on the BADA logo everyone should be aware how long the association has been in existence.”

BADA’s review of its public identity is one of a number of initiatives it is working on (see more on Letters, page 55).

BADA chief executive Marco Forgione said: “BADA must remain relevant. Our focus is on engaging with existing and potential buyers, adding value for members and offering opportunities for those starting out in the trade. None of this is easy and without risk, and is likely to unsettle some.”

Wise words from Benvenuto Cellini

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The logo of the British Antique Dealers' Association, depicting 16th century Florentine goldsmith, sculptor and soldier Benvenuto Cellini, adopted in the early 1920s but revised in 2016.

The circular logo was adopted in the early 1920s and amended in 2016. It depicts Benvenuto Cellini (1500-71), the 16th century Florentine master goldsmith and sculptor. His words ‘Ars non habet inimicum nisi ignorantiam’ (Art has no enemy except ignorance) were chosen as BADA’s motto.

However, the new BADA ‘Exceptional, without exception’ motto was also adopted in 2016.