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Surrey auction house Catherine Southon will include these props from the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory in a July 17 sale, estimated together at £8000-12,000.

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1. A collar necklace

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A flexible collar necklace made by Jacques Lacloche of Lacloche Frères in c.1960 is estimated at £8000-12,000 in the July 16 auction at Roseberys.

At Roseberys in West Norwood, south London this flexible collar necklace composed of a series of candy twist design panels with platinum and diamond intervals will be offered a £8000-12,000 on July 16. It was made by Jacques Lacloche of Lacloche Frères in c.1960.

Lacloche Frères was founded by Jacques’ father and three uncles in Madrid in 1875 and later moved to Paris where it became renowned for its Art Deco jewellery designs. Jacques had a long list of discerning clients, including Prince Rainier, for whom he created a brooch as a wedding gift for Grace Kelly.

It can be viewed on thesaleroom.com

2. A plague panel

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The 17th century plaque showing God's Providence House in Chester which is estimated at £800-1200 in Halls' auction in Chester in July 17.

A 17th century carved vernacular oak panel will be offered at Halls of Shrewsbury on July 17. It portrays the facade of God’s Providence House, 9 Watergate Street, Chester.

The building was reputedly left untouched by the plague while everyone in every other house in the street was killed. That seemingly miraculous event inspired this thank-you carving to God for being spared a dreadful and all too common fate. On the panel the words Gods Providence Is Mine Inheritance are inscribed below an image of the house that was spared.

Although the civil war siege of Chester had been lifted with the surrender of the city on February 3, 1646, the effects of famine and other privations were such that in 1647 the plague broke out. From June 22-April 20, 1648, more than 2000 people died of disease: over a third of the population.

It is estimated at £800-1200 and can be viewed on thesaleroom.com

3. A Romeo and Juliet table

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A float glass and iron Romeo and Juliet table by Danny Lane is being offered with an estimate of £3000-5000 at Chiswick Auctions on July 17.

American artist Danny Lane (b.1955) produced his float glass and iron Romeo and Juliet table in a limited edition of five in 1985, including it in his first solo exhibition at Ron Arad’s (b.1951) influential design and production studio One Off in Shelton Street, London.

Bought directly from the artist by the vendor, an example is being offered with an estimate of £3000-5000 in a Modern Design sale at Chiswick Auctions on July 17. It can be viewed on thesaleroom.com

4. A Willy Wonka golden ticket

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Surrey auction house Catherine Southon will include these props from the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory in a July 17 sale, estimated together at £8000-12,000.

Surrey auction house Catherine Southon will include these props from the 1971 film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory in a July 17 sale in Selsdon. The Golden Ticket and Wonka Bar, guided together at £8000-12,000, were formerly the property of actress Julie Dawn Cole. She played Veruca Salt in the famous film starring Gene Wilder as Willy Wonka.

The props were given by Cole to the current owner’s deceased partner, the former auctioneer Mark Poncia. The gold-coloured foiled printed ticket reads: WONKA’S GOLDEN TICKET/GREETINGS TO YOU, THE LUCKY FINDER OF THIS GOLDEN TICKET, FROM MR. WILLY WONKA….

The Wonka ‘chocolate’ bar is constructed of board with coloured paper surrounds and an outer foil wrapper. The lot can be veiwed on thesaleroom.com

5. A sapphire intaglio ring

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The octagonal faceted stone carved with the bust of a Roman emperor (probably Julius Caesar) which Woolley & Wallis have identified as one of the long-lost Marlborough gems.

This sapphire intaglio ring has been identified as one of the long-lost Marlborough gems. Ahead of its sale this week it was linked to the collection of 800 engraved gems formed by the nobleman and politician George Spencer, 4th Duke of Marlborough (1739-1817), the largest and most important of the age.

The collection resided at Blenheim Palace until it was sold by the 6th Duke en bloc at Christie, Manson & Woods in 1875 to mining magnate David Bromilow (1809-98) of Bitteswell Hall, Leicestershire for £35,000. It was then dispersed piecemeal by Christie’s in 1899. The present whereabouts of two thirds of the gems is now unknown although the Beazley archive in Oxford possesses impressions and electrotype copies of virtually every Marlborough gem as well as the cataloguer's notebooks. It was these that were published as The Marlborough Gems: Formerly at Blenheim Palace, Oxfordshire in 2009. 

This octagonal faceted stone carved with the bust of a Roman emperor (probably Julius Caesar) had an estimate of £600-800 before it was re-catalogued for the July 18 sale. The ring can be viewed on thesaleroom.com