International

About 80% of the global art market by value takes place outside the UK. The largest art market in the world is the US with China in third place (after the UK) followed by France, Germany and Switzerland.

Many more nations have a rich art and antiques heritage with active auction, dealer, fair, gallery and museum sectors even if their market size by value is smaller.

Read the top stories and latest art and antiques news from all these countries.

Triple Pier fair put off after all

30 October 2001

USA: STELLA Management have been forced to cancel New York’s Triple Pier Antiques Show despite moving the venue.

Paris auctions open up at last

30 October 2001

FRANCE: After a long and frustrating delay, Sotheby’s and Christie’s finally got the official go-ahead late last week to conduct auctions in France. They were among the first four auction houses to receive a licence from the French Conseil des Ventes on October 25 and both houses swiftly announced details of their inaugural sales to be held later this year.

Texas fair signals a return to normality

26 October 2001

AWAY from New York, the international trade have been preparing to return to serious business in the US at David and Lee Ann Lester’s second annual Texas International Fine Art Fair, running from November 1 to 7.

Daum lightens a long dark year

26 October 2001

Penrith Farmers' and Kidd's have been badly affected by world events this past year. Situated in one of the worst hit areas for the Foot and Mouth epidemic, the county all but shut up shop. And just as things were starting to pick up the devastating events in America have created a marked caution in the trade.

Rediscovered Leighton offered on sothebys.com

24 October 2001

SOTHEBYS.COM are offering a rare portrait by Frederick Lord Leighton, which has been discovered in the estate of a collector from Indiana in the United States.

NY print dealers improvise too

24 October 2001

THIS year’s annual International Fine Print Dealers Association Print Fair, scheduled for October 31 to November 4, has been cancelled with the forced closure of the Seventh Regiment Armory to non-military activities.

Look SM’ART

22 October 2001

A new design fair made its debut last month in Paris at the Carrousel du Louvre on September 29. Focusing on pieces, from the 1950s to the present SM’ART (le salon du mobilier et de l’objet design) mixed post-war design classics from Italy, France and Scandinavia with works by contemporary designers.

Poussin’s strictly private appeal

22 October 2001

The rediscovery of a significant work by a major Old Master painter is always an event for the art trade, even if the work not obviously commercial. When Anthony Blunt wrote his monograph on Nicholas Poussin (1594-1665) this painting, right, of The Holy Family with St. John the Baptist, executed c.1627-28 when the young Poussin first worked in Rome, was only known from engravings.

Spotlight turns on modern style in the land of the chic

22 October 2001

FRANCE: With Art Deco becoming increasingly rare and costly, collectors and auctioneers are starting to take a serious interest in Post-Deco: furniture and furnishings from the 1940s and later.

Schultz case could blight entire US trade in Egyptian artefacts

16 October 2001

Lawyers have filed a motion attempting to quash a case that has the potential to blight the entire trade in Egyptian antiquities in the United States.

Cloudband finances hit by NY attacks

16 October 2001

Cloudband.com, the specialist Website firm for rugs and textiles, have had their financing badly hit as a direct result of terrorist attacks in New York on September 11.

New York fair organisers expect major disruptions until 2002

15 October 2001

FAIRS organisers in New York plan to approach the city authorities with a view to getting events back on track as soon as possible. But they fear that with the continuing problems facing the city, it will be January at the earliest before suitable space can be found to resume anything close to a normal service.

Christie’s New York sell the library of Abel E. Berland

15 October 2001

Several auction records were broken when Christie’s New York sold the library of Abel E. Berland in an October 8-9 sale that saw 90 per cent of lots sold for a premium-inclusive total of $14.4m (£9.8m).

New growth in Chicago

12 October 2001

The imminent cessation of all sales – including wine – at Sotheby’s Chicago has left a gap in the Mid-West market that newly-established wine auctioneers Edward Roberts International are keen to fill. Brainchild of Edward Robert Brooks, the much-travelled head of Christie’s and the short-lived Phillips’ North American wine departments, Edward Roberts will mount their first live sale of fine and rare wines at The Union League Club of Chicago on Saturday, November 10.

Briest beef up contemporary and modern

10 October 2001

FRANCE: Francis Briest, France’s leading auctioneer of modern and contemporary art, is to join up with the modern art dealers and booksellers Artcurial (acquired by Nicolas Orlowski from Oréal in 1999).

French dealers revolt over UNIDROIT

10 October 2001

France’s Syndicat National des Antiquaires (National Dealers' Association) has called on the French government to reject the Unidroit convention, which enforces strict rules on the restitution of stolen art.

Now New York dealers put on their own shows

08 October 2001

MORE than 20 of New York’s top dealers who had signed up for the cancelled International Fine Art and Antique Dealers Show are holding special selling exhibitions in their shops and galleries from October 18 to 23.

Märklin dominates train sales with top three prices

08 October 2001

FRANCE: The 2nd part of the J. Lemarchand Collection of trains and toys came under the hammer in Chartres (Lelièvre-Maiche-Paris) in a 680-lot sale on September 15 & 16.

Private bids fill the new nervous trade gap

05 October 2001

THE cataclysmic events of September 11 in New York have thrown into spasm a UK art market that was already showing worrying signs of slowdown both in terms of supply and demand.

A Golden Age’s spontaneous charms

04 October 2001

COPENHAGEN: Combining the current commercial attractions of Denmark’s so-called Golden Age painters of the early 19th century with plein air oil sketches by artists made in Italy during the same period, an intriguing group of small canvases by three, albeit relatively minor Danish Golden Age artists sketching in Italy proved to be a predictably desirable target on the second day of Bruun Rasmussen’s (25% buyer’s premium) September 3-5 sale in Copenhagen.

News

Categories