Friday - 31 October 2014

Caramanian pot pourri is a sweet £5000

15 October 2003Written by Roland Arkell

First introduced c.1809, the ‘Caramanian’ series represent one of Spode’s most popular early 19th century pattern ranges.

The designs were taken from the second volume of a three-part work entitled Views in Egypt, Palestine and the Ottoman Empire published in 1803.

Dinner plates decorated in one of these patterns are not too difficult to find with £100-150 in your pocket but Clevedon Salerooms of Bristol offered something more unusual in their sale on September 25.

Estimated at £600-900 in a good ceramics section was a Caramanian two-handled pot pourri, 10in (25cm) high, the body applied with a scene identified as a Colossal Sarcophagus near Castle Rosso, the pierced cover with the Sarcophagi and Sepulchres at the Head of the Harbour at Cacamo and the inner lid with the Ancient Bath at Cacamo.

All pieces carried blue printed marks and were in good condition save some minor chips to the rims. Discovered by the auctioneers in a local property, it sold to a dealer - thought to be acting as agent for a private collector - for £5000.

Another fine example of early 19th century blue and white transfer printed pottery was a c.1830 meat dish, 20in (51cm) across, by Poutney & Goldney printed with a scene of Bristol Harbour with Redcliff Church and the ship David. It sold at £850 to a buyer from North Wales.

The buyer's premium was 15%.

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