Monday - 20 October 2014

Decorative values upgrade the priceson silver

21 May 2001Written by ATG Reporter

UK: TRADITIONAL silver may be a dull market, but make the metal decorative, like the pair of London, 1860 candelabra offered at Peter Wilson auctioneers in Nantwich, Cheshire, and it will shine.

The 221/2in (57cm) high pair, weighing 152oz, were cast with grapevine branches supported by male and female mythological figures standing on fluted outswept bases etched with armorial and shell motifs, They were secured by a North of England trader at £9400.

The candelabra were from a private local source but making a £42,000 contribution to the £187,000 total was a house clearance from a deceased estate across the border in Shropshire which pleased Nantwich specialist Robert Stones and the buyers who are always drawn to sales with fresh good-quality material.

Among some notable entries was a Dutch oak and marquetry inlaid bureau. Dating from the first half of the 18th century and with an ogee shaped fall front, it brought a £4500.

More of a surprise was the 19th century Japanese bronze monkey group with seal to the underside mounted on a wooden plinth.

Underbid by the trade, the group went at £3100, which seemed more of a retail price and begged the question of whether it was by a well-known maker.

From the same collection, an early 20th century Royal Doulton milk bucket with unusual polychrome decoration attracted ten bids on the book and four phone bidders before it sold to a dealer on behalf of a collector at £2400.

Specialist Robert Stones said: "Two local ladies fought it out like their lives depended on it" for a privately consigned estate built dolls' house.
Dated c.1900, the real attraction of the 5ft 11in by 4ft 3in (1.8m x 1.29m) pine and hardboard house was the high- quality of its furnishings - such as a tortoisehell veneered table - and it took £4000.

Peter Wilson, Nantwich,
April 26
Buyer's premium: 15 per cent

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ATG Reporter

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